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previous page Previous Page: Publication 225 - Farmer's Tax Guide - Kinds of Records To Keep
next page Next Page: Publication 225 - Farmer's Tax Guide - Accounting Methods
 Use previous pagenext page to find additional occurrences of topic items.Index for this Publication
taxmap/pubs/p225-003.htm#en_us_publink1000131412

How Long To Keep Records(p4)


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previous topic occurrence Recordkeeping next topic occurrence

You must keep your records as long as they may be needed for the administration of any provision of the Internal Revenue Code. Generally, this means you must keep records that support an item of income or deduction on a return until the period of limitations for that return runs out. Generally, you must keep your records for at least 3 years from when your tax return was due or filed or within 2 years of the date the tax was paid, whichever is later. However, certain records must be kept for a longer period of time, as discussed below.
taxmap/pubs/p225-003.htm#en_us_publink1000131413

Employment taxes.(p5)


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If you have employees, you must keep all employment tax records for at least 4 years after the date the tax becomes due or is paid, whichever is later.
taxmap/pubs/p225-003.htm#en_us_publink1000131414

Assets.(p5)


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Keep records relating to property until the period of limitations expires for the year in which you dispose of the property in a taxable disposition. You must keep these records to figure any depreciation, amortization, or depletion deduction and to figure your basis for computing gain or (loss) when you sell or otherwise dispose of the property.
Generally, if you received property in a nontaxable exchange, your basis in that property is the same as the basis of the property you gave up, increased by any money you paid. You must keep the records on the old property, as well as on the new property, until the period of limitations expires for the year in which you dispose of the new property in a taxable disposition. See Like-Kind Exchanges in chapter 8.
taxmap/pubs/p225-003.htm#en_us_publink1000131415

Records for nontax purposes.(p5)


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When your records are no longer needed for tax purposes, do not discard them until you check to see if you have to keep them longer for other purposes. For example, your insurance company or creditors may require you to keep them longer than the IRS does.
previous pagePrevious Page: Publication 225 - Farmer's Tax Guide - Kinds of Records To Keep
next pageNext Page: Publication 225 - Farmer's Tax Guide - Accounting Methods
 Use previous pagenext page to find additional occurrences of topic items.Index for this Publication