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previous page Previous Page: Publication 519 - U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens - Exemptions
next page Next Page: Publication 519 - U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens - Forms To File
 Use previous pagenext page to find additional occurrences of topic items.Index for this Publication
taxmap/pubs/p519-030.htm#en_us_publink100039269

How To Figure Tax(p34)


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When you figure your U.S. tax for a dual-status year, you are subject to different rules for the part of the year you are a resident and the part of the year you are a nonresident.
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Income(p34)


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All income for your period of residence and all income that is effectively connected with a trade or business in the United States for your period of nonresidence, after allowable deductions, is added and taxed at the rates that apply to U.S. citizens and residents. Income that is not connected with a trade or business in the United States for your period of nonresidence is subject to the flat 30% rate or lower treaty rate. You cannot take any deductions against this income.
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Social security and railroad retirement benefits.(p34)


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During the part of the year you are a nonresident alien, 85% of any U.S. social security benefits (and the equivalent portion of tier 1 railroad retirement benefits) you receive is subject to the flat 30% tax, unless exempt, or subject to a lower treaty rate. (See The 30% Tax in chapter 4.)
During the part of the year you are a resident alien, part of the social security and the equivalent portion of tier 1 railroad retirement benefits will be taxed at graduated rates if your modified adjusted gross income plus half of these benefits is more than a certain base amount.
Use the Social Security Benefits Worksheet in the Form 1040 instructions to help you figure the taxable part of your social security and equivalent tier 1 railroad retirement benefits for the part of the year you were a resident alien.
If you received U.S. social security benefits while you were a nonresident alien, the Social Security Administration will send you Form SSA-1042S showing your combined benefits for the entire year and the amount of tax withheld. You will not receive separate statements for the benefits received during your periods of U.S. residence and nonresidence. Therefore, it is important for you to keep careful records of these amounts. You will need this information to properly complete your return and determine your tax liability.
If you received railroad retirement benefits while you were a nonresident alien, the U.S. Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) will send you Form RRB-1042S, Statement for Nonresident Alien Recipients of Payments by the Railroad Retirement Board, and/or Form RRB-1099-R, Annuities or Pensions by the Railroad Retirement Board. If your country of legal residence changed or your rate of tax changed during the tax year, you may receive more than one form.
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Tax Credits and Payments(p34)


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This discussion covers tax credits and payments for dual-status aliens.
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Credits(p34)


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As a dual-status alien, you generally can claim tax credits using the same rules that apply to resident aliens. There are certain restrictions that may apply. These restrictions are discussed here, along with a brief explanation of credits often claimed by individuals.
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Foreign tax credit.(p34)


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If you have paid or are liable for the payment of income tax to a foreign country on income from foreign sources, you may be able to claim a credit for the foreign taxes.
If you claim the foreign tax credit, you generally must file Form 1116 with your income tax return. For more information, see the instructions for Form 1116 or get Publication 514.
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Child and dependent care credit.(p34)


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You may qualify for this credit if you pay someone to care for your qualifying child who is under age 13, or your disabled dependent or disabled spouse so that you can work or look for work. Generally, you must be able to claim an exemption for your dependent.
Married dual-status aliens can claim the credit only if they choose to file a joint return as discussed in chapter 1, or if they qualify as certain married individuals living apart.
The amount of your child and dependent care expense that qualifies for the credit in any tax year cannot be more than your earned income for that tax year.
For more information, get Publication 503 and Form 2441.
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Retirement savings contributions credit.(p34)


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You may qualify for this credit (also known as the saver's credit) if you made eligible contributions to an employer-sponsored retirement plan or to an individual retirement arrangement (IRA) in 2008. You cannot claim this credit if: Use Form 8880 to figure the credit. For more information, see Publication 590.
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Child tax credit.(p34)


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You may be able to take this credit if you have a qualifying child.
A qualifying child for purposes of the child tax credit is a child who: An adopted child is always treated as your own child. An adopted child includes a child lawfully placed with you for legal adoption.
See your form instructions for additional details.
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Adoption credit.(p34)


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You may qualify to take a tax credit of up to $11,650 for qualifying expenses paid to adopt an eligible child. This amount may be allowed for the adoption of a child with special needs regardless of whether you have qualifying expenses. To claim the adoption credit, file Form 8839 with the U.S. income tax return that you file.
Married dual-status aliens can claim the credit only if they choose to file a joint return with a U.S. citizen or resident spouse as discussed in chapter 1, or if they qualify as certain married individuals living apart.
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Payments(p34)


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You can report as payments against your U.S. income tax liability certain taxes you paid, are considered to have paid, or that were withheld from your income. These include:
previous pagePrevious Page: Publication 519 - U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens - Exemptions
next pageNext Page: Publication 519 - U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens - Forms To File
 Use previous pagenext page to find additional occurrences of topic items.Index for this Publication