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previous page Previous Page: Publication 519 - U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens - When and Where To File
next page Next Page: Publication 519 - U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens - Filing Information
 Use previous pagenext page to find additional occurrences of topic items.Index for this Publication
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039286

Illustration of 
Dual-Status Return(p35)


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previous topic occurrence Dual Status Alien next topic occurrence

Sam R. Brown is single and a subject of the United Kingdom (U.K.). He temporarily entered the United States with an H-1 visa to develop a new product line for the Major Product Co. He arrived in the United States March 18, 2008 and left May 25, 2008, returning to his home in England.
The Major Product Co. later offered Sam a permanent job, and he returned to the United States with a permanent visa on September 10, 2008.
During Sam's temporary assignment in the United States, the Major Product Co. paid him $6,500. He accounted to his employer for his expenses for travel, meals, and lodging while on temporary assignment, and was reimbursed for his expenses. This amount was not included on his wage statement, Form W-2, given to him when he left the United States.
After Sam became permanently employed, his wages for the rest of the year were $21,800, including reimbursement of his moving expenses. He received a separate Form W-2 for this period. His other income received in 2008 was:
Interest income paid by the U.S. Bank (not effectively connected):
March 31$45
June 30$48
September 30$68
December 31$89
  
Dividend income paid by Major Product Co. (not effectively connected):
April 3$120
July 3$120
October 2$120
  
Interest income (in U.S. dollars) paid by the U.K. Bank:
March 31$ 90
June 30$110
September 30$118
December 31$120
  
Sam paid the following expenses while he was in the United States:
Moving expenses incurred and paid in
  September
$8,300
VA state income tax$ 612
Contributions to U.S. charities $ 310
  
Before Sam left the United States in May, he filed Form 1040-C (see chapter 11). He owed no tax when he left the United States.
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039287

Form 1040NR(p35)


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previous topic occurrence U.S. Nonresident Alien Income Tax Return next topic occurrence

Sam completes Form 1040NR as follows.
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039288

Pages 1, 2, and 3.(p35)


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Sam prints his name, address, social security number, and type of entry visa on page 1 of Form 1040NR. He prints "Dual-Status Statement" across the top of the form.
On line 8, Sam enters his salary while a nonresident. He enters the state income tax withheld from his salary on line 37 (carried from page 3, line 17, Schedule A) and the federal income tax withheld ($536) from his salary on line 58. He also carries these amounts to Form 1040 (discussed later).
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Page 4.(p35)


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Sam also reports the not effectively connected U.S. income received while he was a nonresident alien. He reports the April and July dividends from the Major Product Co. in column (c) of line 75a. He figures the tax on his dividend income on lines 87 and 88 and carries it forward to line 52 on Form 1040NR. (The rate of tax on this income is limited to 15% by Article 10 of the U.S.-U.K. income tax treaty. Treaty rates vary from country to country, so be sure to check the provisions in the treaty you are claiming.)
Sam also reports $36, the amount of tax withheld at source by the Major Product Co. in column (a) of lines 75a and 85, Form 1040NR, and carries it forward to line 65. Later he will report the amount on Form 1040.
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039290

Page 5.(p35)


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Sam is not required to report the interest credited to his account by the U.S. Bank during the period he was a nonresident alien. Interest on deposits with U.S. banks that is not effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business generally is treated as income from sources in the United States but is not taxable to a nonresident alien. He checks the "Yes" box on page 5, item L, of Form 1040NR, and explains why this income is not included on his return.
The interest income received from the U.K. Bank while Sam was a nonresident alien is foreign source income and not taxable on his U.S. return.
Sam completes all applicable items on page 5 of Form 1040NR. This provides the dates of arrival and departure, and information concerning tax treaty benefits that he has claimed.
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039291

Form 1040(p35)


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previous topic occurrence U.S. Individual Income Tax Return next topic occurrence

Sam completes Form 1040 as follows.
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039292

Page 1.(p35)


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Sam prints his name, social security number, and address on page 1 of Form 1040. He checks the "You" box for the Presidential Election Campaign Fund and "Single" under filing status. He also checks the exemption block for himself and prints "Dual-Status Return" across the top of the form.
Sam reports on line 7, Form 1040, all wages received during the period he was a resident of the United States ($21,800) and the wages received during the period he was a nonresident alien ($6,500) that was effectively connected with his U.S. trade or business. This income is taxed at the graduated rates.
Sam reports on Form 1040 the interest income credited to his account by the U.S. Bank and the U.K. Bank in September and December, while he was a U.S. resident. If any of the interest income received while he was a nonresident alien was effectively connected with his U.S. trade or business, he would also report these amounts on Form 1040. If he had paid foreign income tax on the interest income received from the U.K. Bank, he would claim a foreign tax credit.
The dividend income includes only the October dividend, which was received while Sam was a U.S. resident. The dividend income received during his period of nonresidence was not effectively connected with his U.S. trade or business and, therefore, not taxed at the graduated rates.
Sam completes Form 3903 (not illustrated) to figure his moving expense deduction and reports the total on Form 1040, line 26.
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039293

Schedule A (Form 1040).(p35)


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Sam cannot claim the standard deduction because he has a dual-status tax year. He reports his itemized deductions on Schedule A (Form 1040). The only itemized deduction he had while he was a nonresident alien was the state income tax withheld from his pay. For information purposes, he lists this amount on Schedule A, line 1, Form 1040NR, in addition to including it on Schedule A, Form 1040.
Sam totals his itemized deductions on line 29, Schedule A (Form 1040).
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039294

Page 2.(p36)


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Sam checks box 39b and reports the amount from line 29 of Schedule A (Form 1040) on line 40, Form 1040.
Sam enters $3,500 for one personal exemption on Form 1040, line 42. He subtracts the amount on line 42 from the amount on line 41 to figure his taxable income, line 43.
Sam is now ready to figure the tax on his income taxed at the graduated rates. He uses the column in the Tax Table for single individuals. He enters $2,010 on line 44. Because he had no alternative minimum tax to add, he enters $2,010 again on line 46.
Sam also enters $2,010 on line 56 because he had no credits to subtract.
To this tax he must add the tax on the income taxed at the 30% or lower treaty rate. Because there is no line on Form 1040 for this tax, he reports the amount ($36) on the dotted line next to line 61 and includes it in the total tax on line 61.
Sam adds the total amount of tax withheld ($2,671) from his wages to the amount of tax withheld at source ($36 from Form 1040NR, line 65). He enters $2,707 on line 62. He also writes a brief explanation.
Sam compares the total tax on Form 1040, line 61 to the total payments on line 71, to see if he has overpaid his tax or if he owes an additional amount. Because the amount of tax withheld and the amount of tax paid at source are more than his total tax, he has overpaid his tax. He subtracts the amount on line 61 from the amount on line 71 to figure his refund.
Sam checks to be sure that he has completed all parts of Form 1040 that apply to him. He also checks to see if he has completed the necessary parts of the Form 1040NR that he is attaching as a statement. He then signs and dates the return and enters his occupation.
Due date
Sam mails the return to the following address.

Department of the Treasury 
Internal Revenue Service Center 
Austin, TX 73301-0215


taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039296
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Form 1040 pg 1&2 Text DescriptionForm 1040 pg 1&2  
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039297
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#TXMP043405cb
Sch A (form 1040) & Form 1040NR pg1 Text DescriptionSch A (form 1040) & Form 1040NR pg1  
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taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#TXMP64f38c30
Form 1040NR pg 2&3 Text DescriptionForm 1040NR pg 2&3  
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039299
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#TXMP639e4837
Form 1040NR pg 4 Text DescriptionForm 1040NR pg 4  
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#en_us_publink100039300
taxmap/pubs/p519-033.htm#TXMP6cdb6634
Form 1040NR pg 5 Text DescriptionForm 1040NR pg 5  
previous pagePrevious Page: Publication 519 - U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens - When and Where To File
next pageNext Page: Publication 519 - U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens - Filing Information
 Use previous pagenext page to find additional occurrences of topic items.Index for this Publication