skip navigation

Search Help
Navigation Help


Main Topics
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q R
S T U V W X Y Z #


FAQs
Forms
Publications
Tax Topics


Comments
About Tax Map

previous page Previous Page: Publication 54 - Tax Guide for U.S. Citizens and Resident Aliens Abroad - Form 2555 and Form 2555-EZ
next page Next Page: Publication 54 - Tax Guide for U.S. Citizens and Resident Aliens Abroad - Exemptions
 Use previous pagenext page to find additional occurrences of topic items.Index for this Publication
taxmap/pubs/p54-014.htm#en_us_publink100047558

Chapter 5
Exemptions, Deductions, and Credits(p30)

spacer


taxmap/pubs/p54-014.htm#TXMP38301490

Useful items

You may want to see:


Publication
 501 Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information
 514 Foreign Tax Credit for Individuals
 521 Moving Expenses
 523 Selling Your Home
 590 Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs)
 597 Information on the United States-Canada Income Tax Treaty
Form (and Instructions)
 1116: Foreign Tax Credit
 2106: Employee Business Expenses
 2555: Foreign Earned Income
 2555-EZ: Foreign Earned Income Exclusion
 3903: Moving Expenses
 Schedule A (Form 1040): Itemized Deductions
 Schedule C (Form 1040): Profit or Loss From Business
 SS-5: Application for a Social Security Card
 W-7: Application for IRS Individual Taxpayer Identification Number
See chapter 7 for information about getting these publications and forms.
taxmap/pubs/p54-014.htm#en_us_publink100047559

Items Related to Excluded Income(p30)


rule
spacer

U.S. citizens and resident aliens living outside the United States generally are allowed the same deductions as citizens and residents living in the United States.
If you choose to exclude foreign earned income or housing amounts, you cannot deduct, exclude, or claim a credit for any item that can be allocated to or charged against the excluded amounts. This includes any expenses, losses, and other normally deductible items that are allocable to the excluded income. You can deduct only those expenses connected with earning includible income.
These rules apply only to items definitely related to the excluded earned income and they do not apply to other items that are not definitely related to any particular type of gross income. These rules do not apply to items such as:
For purposes of these rules, your housing deduction is not treated as allocable to your excluded income, but the deduction for self- 
employment tax is.
If you receive foreign earned income in a tax year after the year in which you earned it, you may have to file an amended return for the earlier year to properly adjust the amounts of deductions, credits, or exclusions allocable to your foreign earned income and housing exclusions.
taxmap/pubs/p54-014.htm#en_us_publink100047560

Example.(p30)

In 2007, you had $80,000 of foreign earned income and $7,500 of deductions allocable to your foreign earned income. You did not have a housing exclusion. If you excluded all of your foreign earned income, you would not have been able to claim any of the deductions on your 2007 return. If you received a $12,000 bonus in 2008 for work you did abroad in 2007, you can exclude $5,700 of the bonus because the limit on the foreign earned income exclusion for 2007 was $85,700 and you have already excluded $80,000. Since you must include $6,300 of the bonus ($12,000 − $5,700) for work you did in 2007 in income, you can file an amended return for 2007 to claim $514 of the deductions. This is the deductions allocable to the foreign earned income ($7,500) multiplied by the includible portion of the foreign earned income ($6,300) and divided by the total foreign earned income for 2007 ($92,000).
previous pagePrevious Page: Publication 54 - Tax Guide for U.S. Citizens and Resident Aliens Abroad - Form 2555 and Form 2555-EZ
next pageNext Page: Publication 54 - Tax Guide for U.S. Citizens and Resident Aliens Abroad - Exemptions
 Use previous pagenext page to find additional occurrences of topic items.Index for this Publication