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taxmap/pubs/p15-004.htm#en_us_publink1000202292

2. Who Are Employees?(p8)


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Generally, employees are defined either under common law or under statutes for certain situations. See Publication 15-A for details on statutory employees and nonemployees.
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Employee status under common law.(p8)


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Generally, a worker who performs services for you is your employee if you have the right to control what will be done and how it will be done. This is so even when you give the employee freedom of action. What matters is that you have the right to control the details of how the services are performed. See Publication 15-A for more information on how to determine whether an individual providing services is an independent contractor or an employee.
Generally, people in business for themselves are not employees. For example, doctors, lawyers, veterinarians, construction contractors, and others in an independent trade in which they offer their services to the public are usually not employees. However, if the business is incorporated, corporate officers who work in the business are employees.
If an employer-employee relationship exists, it does not matter what it is called. The employee may be called an agent or independent contractor. It also does not matter how payments are measured or paid, what they are called, or if the employee works full or part time.
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Statutory employees.(p8)


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If someone who works for you is not an employee under the common law rules discussed above, do not withhold federal income tax from his or her pay, unless backup withholding applies. Although the following persons may not be common law employees, they may be considered employees by statute for social security, Medicare, and FUTA tax purposes under certain conditions.
taxmap/pubs/p15-004.htm#en_us_publink1000202295

Statutory nonemployees.(p9)


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Direct sellers, qualified real estate agents, and certain companion sitters are, by law, considered nonemployees. They are generally treated as self-employed for all federal tax purposes, including income and employment taxes.
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Treating employees as nonemployees.(p9)


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You will generally be liable for social security and Medicare taxes and withheld income tax if you do not deduct and withhold these taxes because you treated an employee as a nonemployee. You may be able to calculate your liability using special section 3509 rates for the employee share of social security and Medicare taxes and the federal income tax withholding. The applicable rates depend on whether you filed required Forms 1099. You cannot recover the employee share of social security, or Medicare tax, or income tax withholding from the employee if the tax is paid under section 3509. You are liable for the income tax withholding regardless of whether the employee paid income tax on the wages. You continue to owe the full employer share of social security and Medicare taxes. The employee remains liable for the employee share of social security and Medicare taxes. See Internal Revenue Code section 3509 for details. Also see the Instructions for Form 941-X.
Section 3509 rates are not available if you intentionally disregard the requirement to withhold taxes from the employee or if you withheld income taxes but not social security or Medicare taxes. Section 3509 is not available for reclassifying statutory employees. See Statutory employees on page 9.
If the employer issued required information returns, the section 3509 rates are:
If the employer did not issue required information returns, the section 3509 rates are:
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Relief provisions.(p9)
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If you have a reasonable basis for not treating a worker as an employee, you may be relieved from having to pay employment taxes for that worker. To get this relief, you must file all required federal tax returns, including information returns, on a basis consistent with your treatment of the worker. You (or your predecessor) must not have treated any worker holding a substantially similar position as an employee for any periods beginning after 1977. See Publication 1976, Do You Qualify for Relief Under Section 530?
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IRS help.(p9)


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If you want the IRS to determine whether a worker is an employee, file Form SS-8, Determination of Worker Status for Purposes of Federal Employment Taxes and Income Tax Withholding.