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About Tax Map
IRS Tax Map 2008
Current IRS Tax Map

taxmap/pubs/p519-010.htm#en_us_publink1000222264

Nonresident Aliens(p15)


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Nonresident aliens can exclude the following items from their gross income.
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Interest Income(p15)


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U.S. source interest income that is not connected with a U.S. trade or business is excluded from income if it is from:
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Government obligations.(p15)


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Interest on obligations of a state or political subdivision, the District of Columbia, or a U.S. possession, generally is not included in income. However, interest on certain private activity bonds, arbitrage bonds, and certain bonds not in registered form is included in income.
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Portfolio interest.(p15)


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U.S. source interest income that is not connected with a U.S. trade or business and that is portfolio interest on obligations issued after July 18, 1984, is excluded from income. Portfolio interest is interest (including original issue discount) that is paid on obligations:
Portfolio interest does not include the following types of interest.
For the definition of 10% shareholder, see Regulations section 1.871-14(g).
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Contingent interest.(p16)
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Portfolio interest does not include contingent interest. Contingent interest is either of the following:
  1. Interest that is determined by reference to:
    1. Any receipts, sales, or other cash flow of the debtor or related person,
    2. Income or profits of the debtor or related person,
    3. Any change in value of any property of the debtor or a related person, or
    4. Any dividend, partnership distributions, or similar payments made by the debtor or a related person.
  2. Any other type of contingent interest that is identified by the Secretary of the Treasury in regulations.
For the definition of "related person" in connection with any contingent interest, and for the exceptions that apply to interest described in item (1), see subparagraphs (B) and (C) of Internal Revenue Code section 871(h)(4).
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Exception for existing debt.(p16)
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Contingent interest does not include interest paid or accrued on any debt with a fixed term that was issued:
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Dividend Income(p16)


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The following dividend income is exempt from the 30% tax.
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Certain dividends paid by foreign corporations.(p16)


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There is no 30% tax on U.S. source dividends you receive from a foreign corporation. See Second exception under Dividends in chapter 2 for how to figure the amount of excludable dividends.
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Certain interest-related dividends.(p16)


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There is no 30% tax on certain interest-related dividends from sources within the United States that you receive from a mutual fund or other regulated investment company. The mutual fund will designate in writing which dividends are interest-related dividends.
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Certain short-term capital gain dividends.(p16)


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There may not be any 30% tax on certain short-term capital gain dividends from sources within the United States that you receive from a mutual fund or other regulated investment company. The mutual fund will designate in writing which dividends are short-term capital gain dividends. This tax relief will not apply to you if you are present in the United States for 183 days or more during your tax year.
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Services Performed  
for Foreign Employer(p16)


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Services Performed for Foreign Employer

If you were paid by a foreign employer, your U.S. source income may be exempt from U.S. tax, but only if you meet one of the situations discussed next.
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Employees of foreign persons, organizations, or offices.(p16)


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Income for personal services performed in the United States as a nonresident alien is not considered to be from U.S. sources and is tax exempt if you meet all three of the following conditions.
  1. You perform personal services as an employee of or under a contract with a nonresident alien individual, foreign partnership, or foreign corporation, not engaged in a trade or business in the United States; or you work for an office or place of business maintained in a foreign country or possession of the United States by a U.S. corporation, a U.S. partnership, or a U.S. citizen or resident.
  2. You perform these services while you are a nonresident alien temporarily present in the United States for a period or periods of not more than a total of 90 days during the tax year.
  3. Your pay for these services is not more than $3,000.
If you do not meet all three conditions, your income from personal services performed in the United States is U.S. source income and is taxed according to the rules in chapter 4.
If your pay for these services is more than $3,000, the entire amount is income from a trade or business within the United States. To find if your pay is more than $3,000, do not include any amounts you get from your employer for advances or reimbursements of business travel expenses, if you were required to and did account to your employer for those expenses. If the advances or reimbursements are more than your expenses, include the excess in your pay for these services.
A day means a calendar day during any part of which you are physically present in the United States.
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Example 1.(p16)

During 2009, Henry Smythe, a nonresident alien from a nontreaty country, worked for an overseas office of a U.S. partnership. Henry, who uses the calendar year as his tax year, was temporarily present in the United States for 60 days during 2009 performing personal services for the overseas office of the partnership. That office paid him a total gross salary of $2,800 for those services. During 2009, he was not engaged in a trade or business in the United States. The salary is not considered U.S. source income and is exempt from U.S. tax.
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Example 2.(p16)

The facts are the same as in Example 1, except that Henry's total gross salary for the services performed in the United States during 2009 was $4,500. He received $2,875 in 2009, and $1,625 in 2010. During 2009, he was engaged in a trade or business in the United States because the compensation for his personal services in the United States was more than $3,000. Henry's salary is U.S. source income and is taxed under the rules in chapter 4.
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Crew members.(p16)


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Compensation for services performed by a nonresident alien in connection with the individual's temporary presence in the United States as a regular crew member of a foreign vessel engaged in transportation between the United States and a foreign country or U.S. possession is not U.S. source income and is exempt from U.S. tax.
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Students and exchange visitors.(p16)


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Nonresident alien students and exchange visitors present in the United States under "F," "J," or "Q" visas can exclude from gross income pay received from a foreign employer.
This group includes bona fide students, scholars, trainees, teachers, professors, research assistants, specialists, or leaders in a field of specialized knowledge or skill, or persons of similar description. It also includes the alien's spouse and minor children if they come with the alien or come later to join the alien.
A nonresident alien temporarily present in the United States under a "J" visa includes an alien individual entering the United States as an exchange visitor under the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961.
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Foreign employer.(p16)
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A foreign employer is:
The term "foreign employer" does not include a foreign government. Pay from a foreign government that is exempt from U.S. income tax is discussed in chapter 10.
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Income from certain annuities.(p16)


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Do not include in income any annuity received under a qualified annuity plan or from a qualified trust exempt from U.S. income tax if you meet both of the following conditions.
  1. You receive the annuity only because:
    1. You performed personal services outside the United States while you were a nonresident alien, or
    2. You performed personal services inside the United States while you were a nonresident alien and you met the three conditions, described earlier, under Employees of foreign persons, organizations, or offices.
  2. At the time the first amount is paid as an annuity under the plan (or by the trust), 90% or more of the employees for whom contributions or benefits are provided under the annuity plan (or under the plan of which the trust is a part) are U.S. citizens or residents.
If the annuity qualifies under condition (1) but not condition (2) above, you do not have to include the amount in income if:
If you are not sure whether the annuity is from a qualified annuity plan or qualified trust, ask the person who made the payment.
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Income affected by treaties.(p17)


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Income of any kind that is exempt from U.S. tax under a treaty to which the United States is a party is excluded from your gross income. Income on which the tax is only limited by treaty, however, is included in gross income. See chapter 9.
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Gambling Winnings From Dog or Horse Racing(p17)


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Gambling Winnings From Dog or Horse Racing

You can exclude from your gross income winnings from legal wagers initiated outside the United States in a parimutuel pool with respect to a live horse or dog race in the United States.