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Publication 571
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239638

Chapter 3
Limit on Annual Additions(p4)

The first component of MAC is the limit on annual additions. This is a limit on the total contributions (elective deferrals, nonelective contributions, and after-tax contributions) that can be made to your 403(b) account. The limit on annual additions generally is the lesser of:
EIC
More than one 403(b) account. If you contributed to more than one 403(b) account, you must combine the contributions made to all 403(b) accounts on your behalf by your employer.
Participation in a qualified plan. If you participated in a 403(b) plan and a qualified plan, you must combine contributions made to your 403(b) account with contributions to a qualified plan and simplified employee pensions of all corporations, partnerships, and sole proprietorships in which you have more than 50% control.
You can use Part I of Worksheet 1 in chapter 9 to figure your limit on annual additions.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239640
Ministers and church employees.(p4)
If you are a minister or a church employee, you may be able to increase your limit on annual additions or use different rules when figuring your limit on annual additions. For more information, see chapter 5.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239641

Includible Compensation for Your Most Recent Year of Service(p4)

rule
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239642

Definition.(p4)

rule
Generally, includible compensation for your most recent year of service is the amount of taxable wages and benefits you received from the employer that maintained a 403(b) account for your benefit during your most recent year of service.
When figuring your includible compensation for your most recent year of service, keep in mind that your most recent year of service may not be the same as your employer's most recent annual work period. This can happen if your tax year is not the same as your employer's annual work period.
When figuring includible compensation for your most recent year of service, do not mix compensation or service of one employer with compensation or service of another employer.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239643

Most Recent Year of Service(p5)

rule
Your most recent year of service is your last full year of service, ending on the last day of your tax year that you worked for the employer that maintains a 403(b) account on your behalf.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239644

Tax year different from employer's annual work period.(p5)

rule
If your tax year is not the same as your employer's annual work period, your most recent year of service is made up of parts of at least two of your employer's annual work periods.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239645

Example.(p5)

A professor who reports her income on a calendar-year basis is employed on a full-time basis by a university that operates on an academic year (October through May). To figure her includible compensation for 2010, the professor's most recent year of service is her service from January through May 2010 and from October through December 2010.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239646

Figuring Your Most Recent Year of Service(p5)

rule
Pencil
To figure your most recent year of service, begin by determining what is a full year of service for your position. A full year of service is equal to full-time employment for your employer's annual work period.
After identifying a full year of service, begin counting the service you have provided for your employer starting with the service provided in the current year.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239648

Part-time or employed only part of the year.(p5)

rule
If you are a part-time or a full-time employee who is employed for only part of the year, your most recent year of service is your service this year and your service for as many previous years as is necessary to total 1 full year of service. To determine your most recent year of service, add the following periods of service:
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Example.(p5)

You were employed on a full-time basis from July through December 2008 (1/2 year of service), July through December 2009 (1/2 year of service), and October through December 2010 (1/4 year of service). Your most recent year of service for computing your limit on annual additions for 2010 is the total of your service during 2010 (1/4 year of service), your service during 2009 (1/2 year of service), and your service during the months October through December 2008 (1/4 year of service).
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239650

Not yet employed for 1 year.(p5)

rule
If, at the close of the year, you have not yet worked for your employer for 1 year (including time you worked for the same employer in all earlier years), use the period of time you have worked for the employer as your most recent year of service.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239651

Includible Compensation(p5)

rule
After identifying your most recent year of service, the next step is to identify the includible compensation associated with that full year of service.
Includible compensation is not the same as income included on your tax return. Compensation is a combination of income and benefits received in exchange for services provided to your employer.
Generally, includible compensation is the amount of income and benefits:
Includible compensation includes the following amounts.
Includible compensation does not include the following items.
  1. Your employer's contributions to your 403(b) account.
  2. Compensation earned while your employer was not an eligible employer.
  3. Your employer's contributions to a qualified plan that:
    1. Are on your behalf, and
    2. Are excludable from income.
  4. The cost of incidental life insurance.
EIC
If you are a church employee or a foreign missionary, figure includible compensation using the rules explained in chapter 5.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239653

Contributions after retirement.(p5)

rule
Nonelective contributions may be made for an employee for up to 5 years after retirement. These contributions would be based on includible compensation for the last year of service before retirement.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239654

Cost of Incidental Life Insurance(p5)

rule
Includible compensation does not include the cost of incidental life insurance.
EIC
If all of your 403(b) accounts invest only in mutual funds, then you have no incidental life insurance.
If you have an annuity contract, a portion of the cost of that contract may be for incidental life insurance. If so, the cost of the insurance is taxable to you in the year contributed and is considered part of your basis when distributed. Your employer will include the cost of your insurance as taxable wages in box 1 of Form W-2.
Not all annuity contracts include life insurance. Contact your plan administrator to determine if your contract includes incidental life insurance. If it does, you will need to figure the cost of life insurance each year the policy is in effect.
Pencil
Figuring the cost of incidental life insurance. If you have determined that part of the cost of your annuity contract is for an incidental life insurance premium, you will need to determine the amount of the premium and subtract it from your includible compensation.
To determine the amount of the life insurance premiums, you will need to know the following information.
You can use Worksheet A, Cost of Incidental Life Insurance, in chapter 9, to determine the cost of your incidental life insurance.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239657

Example.(p5)

Your new contract provides that your beneficiary will receive $10,000 if you should die before retirement. Your cash value in the contract at the end of the first year is zero. Your current life insurance protection for the first year is $10,000 ($10,000 − 0).
The cash value in the contract at the end of year two is $1,000, and the current life insurance protection for the second year is $9,000 ($10,000 – $1,000).
The 1-year cost of the protection can be calculated by using Figure 3-1, Uniform One-Year Term Premiums for $1,000 Life Insurance Protection. The premium rate is determined based on your age on your birthday nearest the beginning of the policy year.

Figure 3-1. Uniform One-Year Term Premiums for $1,000 Life Insurance Protection

AgeCost AgeCost
15$1.27 49$8.53
161.38 509.22
171.48 519.97
181.52 5210.79
191.56 5311.69
201.61 5412.67
211.67 5513.74
221.73 5614.91
231.79 5716.18
241.86 5817.56
251.93 5919.08
262.02 6020.73
272.11 6122.53
282.20 6224.50
292.31 6326.63
302.43 6428.98
312.57 6531.51
322.70 6634.28
332.86 6737.31
343.02 6840.59
353.21 6944.17
363.41 7048.06
373.63 7152.29
383.87 7256.89
394.14 7361.89
404.42 7467.33
414.73 7573.23
425.07 7679.63
435.44 7786.57
445.85 7894.09
456.30 79102.23
466.78 80111.04
477.32 81120.57
487.89   
     
EIC
If the current published premium rates per $1,000 of insurance protection charged by an insurer for individual 1- year term life insurance premiums available to all standard risks are lower than those in the preceding table, you can use the lower rates for figuring the cost of insurance in connection with individual policies issued by the same insurer.
taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239660

Example 1.(p6)

Lynne Green, age 44, and her employer enter into a 403(b) plan that will provide her with a $500 a month annuity upon retirement at age 65. The agreement also provides that if she should die before retirement, her beneficiary will receive the greater of $20,000 or the cash surrender value in the life insurance contract. Using the facts presented we can determine the cost of Lynne's life insurance protection as shown in Table 3-1.
Lynne's employer has included $117 for the cost of the life insurance protection in her current year's income. When figuring her includible compensation for this year, Lynne will subtract $117.

Table 3-1. Worksheet A. Cost of Incidental Life Insurance

Note. Use this worksheet to figure the cost of incidental life insurance included in your annuity contract. This amount will be used to figure includible compensation for your most recent year of service.
1.Enter the value of the contract (amount payable upon your death)1.$20,000.00
2.Enter the cash value in the contract at the end of the year2.0.00
3.Subtract line 2 from line 1. This is the value of your current life insurance protection3.$20,000.00
4.Enter your age on your birthday nearest the beginning of the policy year4.44
5.Enter the 1-year term premium for $1,000 of life insurance based on your age. (From Figure 3-1) 5.$5.85
6.Divide line 3 by $1,0006.20
7.Multiply line 6 by line 5. This is the cost of your incidental life insurance7.$117.00
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Example 2.(p6)

Lynne's cash value in the contract at the end of the second year is $1,000. In year two, the cost of Lynne's life insurance is calculated as shown in Table 3-2.
In year two, Lynne's employer will include $119.70 in her current year's income. Lynne will subtract this amount when figuring her includible compensation.

Table 3-2. Worksheet A. Cost of Incidental Life Insurance

Note. Use this worksheet to figure the cost of incidental life insurance included in your annuity contract. This amount will be used to figure includible compensation for your most recent year of service.
1.Enter the value of the contract (amount payable upon your death)1.$20,000.00
2.Enter the cash value in the contract at the end of the year2.$1,000.00
3.Subtract line 2 from line 1. This is the value of your current life insurance protection3.$19,000.00
4.Enter your age on your birthday nearest the beginning of the policy year4.45
5.Enter the 1-year term premium for $1,000 of life insurance based on your age. (From Figure 3-1)5.$6.30
6.Divide line 3 by $1,0006.19
7.Multiply line 6 by line 5. This is the cost of your incidental life insurance7.$119.70
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Figuring Includible Compensation for Your Most Recent Year of Service(p6)

rule
Pencil
You can use Worksheet B in chapter 9 to determine your includible compensation for your most recent year of service.
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Example.(p6)

Floyd has been periodically working full-time for a local hospital since September 2008. He needs to figure his limit on annual additions for 2011. The hospital's normal annual work period for employees in Floyd's general type of work runs from January to December.
During the periods that Floyd was employed with the hospital, the hospital has always been eligible to provide a 403(b) plan to employees. Additionally, the hospital has never provided the employees with a 457 deferred compensation plan, transportation benefits, or a cafeteria plan.
Floyd has never worked abroad and there is no life insurance provided under the plan.
Table 3-3 shows the service Floyd provided to his employer, his compensation for the periods worked, his elective deferrals, and his taxable wages.

Table 3-3. Floyd's Compensation

Note. This table shows information Floyd will use to figure includible compensation for his most recent year of service.
YearYears of ServiceTaxable WagesElective Deferrals
20116/12 of
a year
$42,000$2,000
20104/12 of
a year
$16,000$1,650
20094/12 of
a year
$16,000$1,650
Before Floyd can figure his limit on annual additions, he must figure includible compensation for his most recent year of service.
Because Floyd is not planning to work the entire 2011 year, his most recent year of service will include the time he is planning to work in 2011 plus time he worked in the preceding 3 years until the time he worked for the hospital totals 1 year. If the total time he worked is less than 1 year, Floyd will treat it as if it were 1 year. He figures his most recent year of service shown in the following list.
Using the information provided in Table 3-3, wages for Floyd's most recent year of service are $66,000 ($42,000 + $16,000 + $8,000). His includible compensation for his most recent year of service is figured as shown in Table 3-4.
After figuring his includible compensation, Floyd determines his limit on annual additions for 2011 to be $49,000, the lesser of his includible compensation, $70,475 (Table 3-4), and the maximum amount of $49,000. taxmap/pubs/p571-011.htm#en_us_publink1000239668

Table 3-4. Worksheet B. Includible Compensation for Your Most Recent Year of Service1

Note. Use this worksheet to figure includible compensation for your most recent year of service.

1.Enter your includible wages from the employer maintaining your 403(b) account for your most recent year of service1.$66,000
2.Enter elective deferrals excluded from your gross income for your most recent year of service22. 4,4753
3.Enter amounts contributed or deferred by your employer under a cafeteria plan for your most recent year of service3.-0-
4.Enter amounts contributed or deferred by your employer to your 457 account (a nonqualified plan of a state or local government, or of a tax-exempt organization) for your most recent year of service 4.-0-
5.Enter the value of qualified transportation fringe benefits you received from your employer for your most recent year of service5.-0-
6.Enter your foreign earned income exclusion for your most recent year of service6.-0-
7.Add lines 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 67.70,475
8.Enter the cost of incidental life insurance that is part of your annuity contract for your most recent year of service8.-0-
9.Enter compensation that was both:
  • Earned during your most recent year of service, and
  • Earned while your employer was not qualified to maintain a 403(b) plan
9.-0-
10.Add lines 8 and 910.-0-
11.Subtract line 10 from line 7. This is your includible compensation for your most recent year of service11.70,475
1 Use estimated amounts if figuring includible compensation before the end of the year.
2 Elective deferrals made to a designated Roth account are not excluded from your gross income and should not be included on this line.
3$4,475 ($2,000 + $1,650 + $825).