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Current Year Tax Map
Publication 504
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175890

Exemptions(p6)

rule
You can deduct $3,800 for each exemption you claim in 2012.
There are two types of exemptions: personal exemptions and exemptions for dependents. If you are entitled to claim an exemption for a dependent (such as your child), that dependent cannot claim his or her personal exemption on his or her own tax return.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175892

Personal Exemptions(p7)

rule
You can claim your own exemption unless someone else can claim it. If you are married, you may be able to take an exemption for your spouse. These are called personal exemptions.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175893

Exemption for Your Spouse(p7)

rule
Your spouse is never considered your dependent.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175894

Joint return.(p7)

rule
On a joint return, you can claim one exemption for yourself and one for your spouse.
If your spouse had any gross income, you can claim his or her exemption only if you file a joint return.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175895

Separate return.(p7)

rule
If you file a separate return, you can take an exemption for your spouse only if your spouse had no gross income, is not filing a return, and was not the dependent of another taxpayer. If your spouse is the dependent of another taxpayer, you cannot claim an exemption for your spouse even if the other taxpayer does not actually claim your spouse's exemption.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175896
Alimony paid.(p8)
If you paid alimony to your spouse, you cannot take an exemption for your spouse. This is because alimony is gross income to the spouse who received it.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175897

Divorced or separated spouse.(p8)

rule
If you obtained a final decree of divorce or separate maintenance during the year, you cannot take your former spouse's exemption. This rule applies even if you provided all of your former spouse's support.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175898

Exemptions for Dependents(p8)

rule
You are allowed one exemption for each person you can claim as a dependent. You can claim an exemption for a dependent even if your dependent files a return.
The term "dependent" means:
Table 3 shows the tests that must be met to be either a qualifying child or qualifying relative, plus the additional requirements for claiming an exemption for a dependent. For detailed information, see Publication 501.
EIC
Dependent not allowed a personal exemption. If you can claim an exemption for your dependent, the dependent cannot claim his or her own exemption on his or her own tax return. This is true even if you do not claim the dependent's exemption on your return.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000273723

Table 3. Overview of the Rules for Claiming an Exemption for a Dependent

Caution. This table is only an overview of the rules. For details, see Publication 501.

You cannot claim any dependents if you, or your spouse if filing jointly, could be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer.
You cannot claim a married person who files a joint return as a dependent unless that joint return is only a claim for refund and there would be no tax liability for either spouse on separate returns.
You cannot claim a person as a dependent unless that person is a U.S. citizen, U.S. resident alien, U.S. national, or a resident of Canada or Mexico, for some part of the year.1
You cannot claim a person as a dependent unless that person is your qualifying child or qualifying relative.
 Tests To Be a Qualifying Child Tests To Be a Qualifying Relative
1.



2.





3.


4.


5.

The child must be your son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, stepsister, or a descendant of any of them.

The child must be (a) under age 19 at the end of the year and younger than you (or your spouse, if filing jointly), (b) under age 24 at the end of the year, a full-time student, and younger than you (or your spouse, if filing jointly), or (c) any age if permanently and totally disabled.

The child must have lived with you for more than half of the year.2

The child must not have provided more than half of his or her own support for the year.

The child is not filing a joint return for the year (unless that joint return is filed only as a claim for refund).
1.


2.





3.


4.
The person cannot be your qualifying child or the qualifying child of anyone else.

The person either (a) must be related to you in one of the ways listed under Relatives who do not have to live with you in Publication 501 or (b) must live with you all year as a member of your household 2 (and your relationship must not violate local law).

The person's gross income for the year must be less than $3,800.3

You must provide more than half of the person's total support for the year.4
If the child meets the rules to be a qualifying child of more than one person, only one person can actually treat the child as a qualifying child. See Special Rule for Qualifying Child of More Than One Person, later, to find out which person is the person entitled to claim the child as a qualifying child.     
1 Exception exists for certain adopted children.
2 Exceptions exist for temporary absences, children who were born or died during the year, children of divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart), and kidnapped children.
3 Exception exists for persons who are disabled and have income from a sheltered workshop.
4 Exceptions exist for multiple support agreements, children of divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart), and kidnapped children. See Publication 501.
Deposit
You may be entitled to a child tax credit for each qualifying child who was under age 17 at the end of the year if you claimed an exemption for that child. For more information, see the instructions for the tax form you file (Form 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ).
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175907

Children of Divorced or Separated Parents (or Parents Who Live Apart)(p8)

rule
In most cases, because of the residency test (see item 3 under Tests To Be a Qualifying Child in Table 3), a child of divorced or separated parents is the qualifying child of the custodial parent. However, the child will be treated as the qualifying child of the noncustodial parent if the special rule (discussed next) applies.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175911

Special rule for divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart).(p8)

rule
A child will be treated as the qualifying child of his or her noncustodial parent if all four of the following statements are true.
  1. The parents:
    1. Are divorced or legally separated under a decree of divorce or separate maintenance,
    2. Are separated under a written separation agreement, or
    3. Lived apart at all times during the last 6 months of the year, whether or not they are or were married.
  2. The child received over half of his or her support for the year from the parents.
  3. The child is in the custody of one or both parents for more than half of the year.
  4. Either of the following applies.
    1. The custodial parent signs a written declaration, discussed later, that he or she will not claim the child as a dependent for the year, and the noncustodial parent attaches this written declaration to his or her return. (If the decree or agreement went into effect after 1984, see Divorce decree or separation agreement that went into effect after 1984 and before 2009, later.
    2. A pre-1985 decree of divorce or separate maintenance or written separation agreement that applies to 2012 states that the noncustodial parent can claim the child as a dependent, the decree or agreement was not changed after 1984 to say the noncustodial parent cannot claim the child as a dependent, and the noncustodial parent provides at least $600 for the child's support during 2012. See Child support under pre-1985 agreement, later.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221540
Custodial parent and noncustodial parent.(p8)
The custodial parent is the parent with whom the child lived for the greater number of nights during the year. The other parent is the noncustodial parent.
If the parents divorced or separated during the year and the child lived with both parents before the separation, the custodial parent is the one with whom the child lived for the greater number of nights during the rest of the year.
A child is treated as living with a parent for a night if the child sleeps:
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221541
Equal number of nights.(p8)
If the child lived with each parent for an equal number of nights during the year, the custodial parent is the parent with the higher adjusted gross income.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221542
December 31.(p8)
The night of December 31 is treated as part of the year in which it begins. For example, December 31, 2012, is treated as part of 2012.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221543
Emancipated child.(p8)
If a child is emancipated under state law, the child is treated as not living with either parent. See Examples 5 and 6 .
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221544
Absences.(p9)
If a child was not with either parent on a particular night (because, for example, the child was staying at a friend's house), the child is treated as living with the parent with whom the child normally would have lived for that night, except for the absence. But if it cannot be determined with which parent the child normally would have lived or if the child would not have lived with either parent that night, the child is treated as not living with either parent that night.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221545
Parent works at night.(p9)
If, due to a parent's nighttime work schedule, a child lives for a greater number of days but not nights with the parent who works at night, that parent is treated as the custodial parent. On a school day, the child is treated as living at the primary residence registered with the school.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221546

Example 1 – child lived with one parent greater number of nights.(p9)

You and your child’s other parent are divorced. In 2012, your child lived with you 210 nights and with the other parent 156 nights. You are the custodial parent.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221547

Example 2 – child is away at camp.(p9)

In 2012, your daughter lives with each parent for alternate weeks. In the summer, she spends 6 weeks at summer camp. During the time she is at camp, she is treated as living with you for 3 weeks and with her other parent, your ex-spouse, for 3 weeks because this is how long she would have lived with each parent if she had not attended summer camp.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221548

Example 3 – child lived same number of days with each parent.(p9)

Your son lived with you 180 nights during the year and lived the same number of nights with his other parent, your ex-spouse. Your adjusted gross income is $40,000. Your ex-spouse's adjusted gross income is $25,000. You are treated as your son's custodial parent because you have the higher adjusted gross income.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221549

Example 4 – child is at parent’s home but with other parent. (p10)

Your son normally lives with you during the week and with his other parent, your ex-spouse, every other weekend. You become ill and are hospitalized. The other parent lives in your home with your son for 10 consecutive days while you are in the hospital. Your son is treated as living with you during this 10-day period because he was living in your home.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221550

Example 5 – child emancipated in May.(p10)

When your son turned age 18 in May 2012, he became emancipated under the law of the state where he lives. As a result, he is not considered in the custody of his parents for more than half of the year. The special rule for children of divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart) does not apply.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221551

Example 6 – child emancipated in August.(p10)

Your daughter lives with you from January 1, 2012, until May 31, 2012, and lives with her other parent, your ex-spouse, from June 1, 2012, through the end of the year. She turns 18 and is emancipated under state law on August 1, 2012. Because she is treated as not living with either parent beginning on August 1, she is treated as living with you the greater number of nights in 2012. You are the custodial parent.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175917
Written declaration.(p10)
The custodial parent must use either Form 8332 or a similar statement (containing the same information required by the form) to make the written declaration to release the exemption to the noncustodial parent. The noncustodial parent must attach a copy of the form or statement to his or her tax return.
The exemption can be released for 1 year, for a number of specified years (for example, alternate years), or for all future years, as specified in the declaration.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175918
Divorce decree or separation agreement that went into effect after 1984 and before 2009.(p10)
If the divorce decree or separation agreement went into effect after 1984 and before 2009, the noncustodial parent may be able to attach certain pages from the decree or agreement instead of Form 8332. To be able to do this, the decree or agreement must state all three of the following.
  1. The noncustodial parent can claim the child as a dependent without regard to any condition, such as payment of support.
  2. The custodial parent will not claim the child as a dependent for the year.
  3. The years for which the noncustodial parent, rather than the custodial parent, can claim the child as a dependent.
The noncustodial parent must attach all of the following pages of the decree or agreement to his or her return.
EIC
The noncustodial parent must attach the required information even if it was filed with a return in an earlier year.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175920
Post-2008 divorce decree or separation agreement.(p10)
If the decree or agreement went into effect after 2008, a noncustodial parent claiming an exemption for a child cannot attach pages from a divorce decree or separation agreement instead of Form 8332. The custodial parent must sign either a Form 8332 or a similar statement. The only purpose of this statement must be to release the custodial parent's claim to the child's exemption. The noncustodial parent must attach a copy to his or her return. The form or statement must release the custodial parent's claim to the child without any conditions. For example, the release must not depend on the noncustodial parent paying support.
The noncustodial parent must attach the required information even if it was filed with a return in an earlier year.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000221552
Revocation of release of claim to an exemption.(p10)
The custodial parent can revoke a release of claim to exemption that he or she previously released to the noncustodial parent on Form 8332 or a similar statement. In order for the revocation to be effective for 2012, the custodial parent must have given (or made reasonable efforts to give) written notice of the revocation to the noncustodial parent in 2011 or earlier. The custodial parent can use Part III of Form 8332 for this purpose and must attach a copy of the revocation to his or her return for each tax year he or she claims the child as a dependent as a result of the revocation.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175921
Remarried parent.(p10)
If you remarry, the support provided by your new spouse is treated as provided by you.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175922
Child support under pre-1985 agreement.(p10)
All child support payments actually received from the noncustodial parent under a pre-1985 agreement are considered used for the support of the child, even if such amounts are not actually spent for child support.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175923

Example.(p10)

Under a pre-1985 agreement, the noncustodial parent provides $1,200 for the child's support. This amount is considered support provided by the noncustodial parent even if the $1,200 was actually spent on things other than support.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175924
Parents who never married.(p10)
The special rule for divorced or separated parents also applies to parents who never married and lived apart at all times during the last 6 months of the year.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000175928
Alimony.(p10)
Payments to your spouse that are includible in his or her gross income as either alimony, separate maintenance payments, or similar payments from an estate or trust, are not treated as a payment for the support of a dependent.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000242188

Special Rule for Qualifying Child of More Than One Person(p11)

rule
Deposit
If your qualifying child is not a qualifying child of anyone else, this special rule does not apply to you and you do not need to read about it. This is also true if your qualifying child is not a qualifying child of anyone else except your spouse with whom you file a joint return.
EIC
Sometimes, a child meets the relationship, age, residency, support, and joint return tests to be a qualifying child of more than one person. (For a description of these tests, see list items 1 through 5 under Tests To Be a Qualifying Child in Table 3). Although the child meets the conditions to be a qualifying child of each of these persons, only one person can actually use the child as a qualifying child to take all of the following tax benefits (provided the person is eligible for each benefit).
  1. The exemption for the child.
  2. The child tax credit.
  3. Head of household filing status.
  4. The credit for child and dependent care expenses.
  5. The exclusion from income for dependent care benefits.
  6. The earned income credit.
The other person cannot take any of these benefits based on this qualifying child. In other words, you and the other person cannot agree to divide these tax benefits between you. The other person cannot take any of these tax benefits unless he or she has a different qualifying child.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000242194

Tiebreaker rules.(p11)

rule
To determine which person can treat the child as a qualifying child to claim these six tax benefits, the following tiebreaker rules apply.
Subject to these tiebreaker rules, you and the other person may be able to choose which of you claims the child as a qualifying child.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000242195

Example 1—separated parents.(p11)

You, your husband, and your 10-year-old son lived together until August 1, 2012, when your husband moved out of the household. In August and September, your son lived with you. For the rest of the year, your son lived with your husband, the boy's father. Your son is a qualifying child of both you and your husband because your son lived with each of you for more than half the year and because he met the relationship, age, support, and joint return tests for both of you. At the end of the year, you and your husband still were not divorced, legally separated, or separated under a written separation agreement, so the special rule for divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart) does not apply.
You and your husband will file separate returns. Your husband agrees to let you treat your son as a qualifying child. This means, if your husband does not claim your son as a qualifying child, you can claim your son as a dependent and treat him as a qualifying child for the child tax credit and exclusion for dependent care benefits, if you qualify for each of those tax benefits. However, you cannot claim head of household filing status because you and your husband did not live apart the last 6 months of the year. As a result, your filing status is married filing separately, so you cannot claim the earned income credit or the credit for child and dependent care expenses.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000242196

Example 2—separated parents claim same child. (p11)

The facts are the same as in Example 1 except that you and your husband both claim your son as a qualifying child. In this case, only your husband will be allowed to treat your son as a qualifying child. This is because, during 2012, the boy lived with him longer than with you. If you claimed an exemption, the child tax credit, or the exclusion for dependent care benefits for your son, the IRS will disallow your claim to all these tax benefits, unless you have another qualifying child. In addition, because you and your husband did not live apart the last 6 months of the year, your husband cannot claim head of household filing status. As a result, his filing status is married filing separately, so he cannot claim the earned income credit or the credit for child and dependent care expenses.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000242197

Applying this special rule to divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart).(p11)

rule
If a child is treated as the qualifying child of the noncustodial parent under the special rule for divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart) described earlier, only the noncustodial parent can claim an exemption and the child tax credit for the child. However, the noncustodial parent cannot claim the child as a qualifying child for head of household filing status, the credit for child and dependent care expenses, the exclusion for dependent care benefits, and the earned income credit. Only the custodial parent, if eligible, or another eligible taxpayer can claim the child as a qualifying child for those four tax benefits. If the child is the qualifying child of more than one person for those tax benefits, the tiebreaker rules determine which person can treat the child as a qualifying child.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000242198

Example 1.(p12)

You and your 5-year-old son lived all year with your mother, who paid the entire cost of keeping up the home. Your AGI is $10,000. Your mother's AGI is $25,000. Your son's father does not live with you or your son. Under the rules for children of divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart), your son is treated as the qualifying child of his father, who can claim an exemption and the child tax credit for the child if he meets all the requirements to do so. Because of this, you cannot claim an exemption or the child tax credit for your son. However, your son's father cannot claim your son as a qualifying child for head of household filing status, the credit for child and dependent care expenses, the exclusion for dependent care benefits, or the earned income credit.
You and your mother did not have any child care expenses or dependent care benefits, but the boy is a qualifying child of both you and your mother for head of household filing status and the earned income credit because he meets the relationship, age, residency, support, and joint return tests for both you and your mother. (Note: The support test does not apply for the earned income credit.) However, you agree to let your mother claim your son. This means she can claim him for head of household filing status and the earned income credit if she qualifies for each and if you do not claim him as a qualifying child for the earned income credit. (You cannot claim head of household filing status because your mother paid the entire cost of keeping up the home.)
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000242200

Example 2.(p12)

The facts are the same as in Example 1 except that your AGI is $25,000 and your mother's AGI is $21,000. Your mother cannot claim your son as a qualifying child for any purpose because her AGI is not higher than yours.
taxmap/pubs/p504-001.htm#en_us_publink1000242199

Example 3.(p12)

The facts are the same as in Example 1 except that you and your mother both claim your son as a qualifying child for the earned income credit. Your mother also claims him as a qualifying child for head of household filing status. You as the child's parent will be the only one allowed to claim your son as a qualifying child for the earned income credit. The IRS will disallow your mother's claim to the earned income credit and head of household filing status unless she has another qualifying child.