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IRS.gov Website

Frequently Asked Tax Questions

IRS Procedures - General Procedural Questions

  1. What are the tax changes for this year?
  2. Will the IRS figure the amount of tax and credits for taxpayers?
  3. What should I do if I'm concerned because my check for payment to the IRS has not been cashed yet?
  4. How can I become an authorized e-file provider?

Rev. date: 02/19/2016

What are the tax changes for this year?

For highlights of the tax changes for the current tax year, refer to the "What's New" section of the following:
For a list of tax benefits extended, see Recent Developments for Publication 17.

Rev. date: 10/09/2015

Will the IRS figure the amount of tax and credits for taxpayers?

Yes, if you choose, the IRS will figure your tax, the credit for the elderly or the disabled, and the earned income credit for you on your Form 1040EZ, Form 1040A, or Form 1040 provided that:
  1. You file your return on or before April 18, 2016 (April 19, 2016 for taxpayers in Maine and Massachusetts), and
  2. None of the 7 criteria listed in Chapter 30 of Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax For Individuals, that prevent the IRS from figuring your tax apply.

Rev. date: 01/19/2016

What should I do if I'm concerned because my check for payment to the IRS has not been cashed yet?

You should check first with your financial institution to verify that your check has not cleared your account before you contact the IRS.
If it has been at least two weeks since you sent your payment to the IRS and your financial institution verifies that the check has not cleared your account, you can call the IRS's toll-free number at 800-829-1040 to ask if the payment has been credited to your account.
If the payment has not been credited and your check has not cleared, you may choose to place a stop payment order on the original check and send another payment. In this case, the IRS does not charge a failure to pay penalty.
Payment methods:

Rev. date: 01/20/2016

How can I become an authorized e-file provider?

An authorized IRS e-file provider can be an Electronic Return Originator, Intermediate Service Provider, Transmitter, Reporting AgentOnline Provider, ACA Provider, or Software Developer. Before you become an e-file participant, you should choose the authorized IRS e-file options that are best for you. Publication 1345, Handbook for Authorized IRS e-file Providers of Individual Income Tax Returns, and Publication 3112, IRS e-file Application and Participation, are available to help you determine the best e-file options for you and how to participate.