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IRS.gov Website
Publication 590
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231057

Are Distributions Taxable?(p70)

rule
You do not include in your gross income qualified distributions or distributions that are a return of your regular contributions from your Roth IRA(s). You also do not include distributions from your Roth IRA that you roll over tax free into another Roth IRA. You may have to include part of other distributions in your income. See Ordering Rules for Distributions, later.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231059

Basis of distributed property.(p70)

rule
The basis of property distributed from a Roth IRA is its fair market value (FMV) on the date of distribution, whether or not the distribution is a qualified distribution.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231060

Withdrawals of contributions by due date.(p70)

rule
If you withdraw contributions (including any net earnings on the contributions) by the due date of your return for the year in which you made the contribution, the contributions are treated as if you never made them. If you have an extension of time to file your return, you can withdraw the contributions and earnings by the extended due date. The withdrawal of contributions is tax free, but you must include the earnings on the contributions in income for the year in which you made the contributions.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231061

What Are Qualified Distributions?(p70)

rule
A qualified distribution is any payment or distribution from your Roth IRA that meets the following requirements.
  1. It is made after the 5-year period beginning with the first taxable year for which a contribution was made to a Roth IRA set up for your benefit, and
  2. The payment or distribution is:
    1. Made on or after the date you reach age 591/2,
    2. Made because you are disabled (defined earlier),
    3. Made to a beneficiary or to your estate after your death, or
    4. One that meets the requirements listed under First home under Exceptions in chapter 1 (up to a $10,000 lifetime limit).
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231064

Additional Tax on Early Distributions(p71)

rule
If you receive a distribution that is not a qualified distribution, you may have to pay the 10% additional tax on early distributions as explained in the following paragraphs.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231065

Distributions of conversion and certain rollover contributions within 5-year period.(p71)

rule
If, within the 5-year period starting with the first day of your tax year in which you convert an amount from a traditional IRA or rollover an amount from a qualified retirement plan to a Roth IRA, you take a distribution from a Roth IRA, you may have to pay the 10% additional tax on early distributions. You generally must pay the 10% additional tax on any amount attributable to the part of the amount converted or rolled over (the conversion or rollover contribution) that you had to include in income (recapture amount). A separate 5-year period applies to each conversion and rollover. See Ordering Rules for Distributions, later, to determine the recapture amount, if any.
The 5-year period used for determining whether the 10% early distribution tax applies to a distribution from a conversion or rollover contribution is separately determined for each conversion and rollover, and is not necessarily the same as the 5-year period used for determining whether a distribution is a qualified distribution. See What Are Qualified Distributions, earlier.
For example, if a calendar-year taxpayer makes a conversion contribution on February 25, 2013, and makes a regular contribution for 2012 on the same date, the 5-year period for the conversion begins January 1, 2013, while the 5-year period for the regular contribution begins on January 1, 2012.
Unless one of the exceptions listed later applies, you must pay the additional tax on the portion of the distribution attributable to the part of the conversion or rollover contribution that you had to include in income because of the conversion or rollover.
You must pay the 10% additional tax in the year of the distribution, even if you had included the conversion or rollover contribution in an earlier year. You also must pay the additional tax on any portion of the distribution attributable to earnings on contributions.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231068

Other early distributions.(p71)

rule
Unless one of the exceptions listed below applies, you must pay the 10% additional tax on the taxable part of any distributions that are not qualified distributions.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231069

Exceptions.(p71)

rule
You may not have to pay the 10% additional tax in the following situations. Most of these exceptions are discussed earlier in chapter 1 under Early Distributions.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231063
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231071

Ordering Rules for Distributions(p73)

rule
If you receive a distribution from your Roth IRA that is not a qualified distribution, part of it may be taxable. There is a set order in which contributions (including conversion contributions and rollover contributions from qualified retirement plans) and earnings are considered to be distributed from your Roth IRA. For these purposes, disregard the withdrawal of excess contributions and the earnings on them (discussed earlier under What if You Contribute Too Much). Order the distributions as follows.
  1. Regular contributions.
  2. Conversion and rollover contributions, on a first-in, first-out basis (generally, total conversions and rollovers from the earliest year first). See Aggregation (grouping and adding) rules, later. Take these conversion and rollover contributions into account as follows:
    1. Taxable portion (the amount required to be included in gross income because of the conversion or rollover) first, and then the
    2. Nontaxable portion.
  3. Earnings on contributions.
Disregard rollover contributions from other Roth IRAs for this purpose.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231074
Aggregation (grouping and adding) rules.(p73)
Determine the taxable amounts distributed (withdrawn), distributions, and contributions by grouping and adding them together as follows. Add any recharacterized contributions that end up in a Roth IRA to the appropriate contribution group for the year that the original contribution would have been taken into account if it had been made directly to the Roth IRA.
Disregard any recharacterized contribution that ends up in an IRA other than a Roth IRA for the purpose of grouping (aggregating) both contributions and distributions. Also disregard any amount withdrawn to correct an excess contribution (including the earnings withdrawn) for this purpose.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231075

Example.(p73)

On October 15, 2009, Justin converted all $80,000 in his traditional IRA to his Roth IRA. His Forms 8606 from prior years show that $20,000 of the amount converted is his basis.
Justin included $60,000 ($80,000 − $20,000) in his gross income.
On February 23, 2013, Justin made a regular contribution of $5,000 to a Roth IRA. On November 8, 2013, at age 60, Justin took a $7,000 distribution from his Roth IRA.
The first $5,000 of the distribution is a return of Justin's regular contribution and is not includible in his income.
The next $2,000 of the distribution is not includible in income because it was included previously.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000265798
Figuring your recapture amount.(p73)
If you had an early distribution from your Roth IRAs in 2013, you must allocate the early distribution by using the Recapture Amount—Allocation Chart, later.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000308984
Pencil

Recapture Amount—Allocation Chart

Enter the amount from your 2013 Form 8606, line 19
Before you begin: You will need your prior year Form(s) 8606 and income tax return(s) if you entered an amount on any line(s) as indicated below.

You will now allocate the amount you entered above (2013 Form 8606, line 19) in the order shown, to the amounts on the lines listed below (to the extent a prior year distribution was not allocable to the amount). The maximum amount you can enter on each line below is the amount entered on the referenced lines of the form for that year. Note. Once you have allocated the full amount from your 2013 Form 8606, line 19, STOP. See the Example, earlier.
Tax YearYour Form
2013Form 8606, line 20Form 8606, line 22
1998Form 8606, line 16Form 8606, line 15
1999Form 8606, line 16Form 8606, line 15
2000Form 8606, line 16Form 8606, line 15
2001Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2002Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2003Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2004Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2005Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2006Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2007Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2008Form 8606, line 18
and
Form 1040, line 16b; Form 1040A, line 12b; or Form 1040NR, line 17b*
Form 8606, line 17
and
Form 1040, line 16a; Form 1040A, line 12a; or Form 1040NR, line 17a**
2009Form 8606, line 18
and
Form 1040, line 16b; Form 1040A, line 12b; or Form 1040NR, line 17b*
Form 8606, line 17
and
Form 1040, line 16a; Form 1040A, line 12a; or Form 1040NR, line 17a**
2010Form 8606, lines 18 and 23Form 8606, lines 17 and 22
2011Form 8606, line 18
and
Form 1040, line 16b; Form 1040A, line 12b; or Form 1040NR, line 17b*
Form 8606, line 17
and
Form 1040, line 16a; Form 1040A, line 12a; or Form 1040NR, line 17a**
2012Form 8606, line 18
and
Form 1040, line 16b; Form 1040A, line 12b; or Form 1040NR, line 17b*
Form 8606, line 17
and
Form 1040, line 16a; Form 1040A, line 12a; or Form 1040NR, line 17a**
2013Form 8606, line 18
and
Form 1040, line 16b; Form 1040A, line 12b; or Form 1040NR, line 17b*
Form 8606, line 17
and
Form 1040, line 16a; Form 1040A, line 12a; or Form 1040NR, line 17a**
2013Form 8606, line 25  
*Only include those amounts rolled over to a Roth IRA.
**Only include any contributions (usually Form 1099-R, box 5) that were taxable to you when made and rolled over to a Roth IRA.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000266521
Amount to include on Form 5329, line 1.(p73)
Include on line 1 of your 2013 Form 5329 the following four amounts from the Recapture Amount—Allocation Chart that you filled out.
Also, include any amount you allocated to line 20 of your 2013 Form 8606 on your 2013 Form 5329, line 2, and enter exception number 09.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000308997

Example.(p73)

Ishmael, age 32, opened a Roth IRA in 2000. He made the maximum contributions to it every year. In addition, he made the following transactions into his Roth IRA.The total balance in his Roth IRA as of January 1, 2013 was $105,000 ($50,000 in contributions from 2000 through 2012 + $10,000 from the 2005 conversion + $20,000 from the 2011 rollover + $25,000 from earnings). He has not taken any early distribution from his Roth IRA before 2013. In 2013, he made the maximum contribution of $5,500 to his Roth IRA.
In August of 2013, he took a $85,500 early distribution from his Roth IRA to use as a down payment on the purchase of his first home. See his filled out Illustrated Recapture Amount—Allocation Chart, later, to see how he allocated the amounts from the above transactions. Based on his allocation, he would enter $20,000 on his 2013 Form 5329, line 1 (see Amount to include on Form 5329, line 1, above). He should also report $10,000 on his 2013 Form 5329, line 2, and enter exception 09 since that amount is not subject to the 10% additional tax on early distributions.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000308987
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Illustrated Recapture Amount—Allocation Chart

Enter the amount from your 2013 Form 8606, line 19$85,500
Before you begin: You will need your prior year Form(s) 8606 and income tax return(s) if you entered an amount on any line(s) as indicated below.

You will now allocate the amount you entered above (2013 Form 8606, line 19) in the order shown, to the amounts on the lines listed below (to the extent a prior year distribution was not allocable to the amount). The maximum amount you can enter on each line below is the amount entered on the referenced lines of the form for that year. Note. Once you have allocated the full amount from your 2013 Form 8606, line 19, STOP. See the Example, earlier.
Tax YearYour Form
2013Form 8606, line 20$10,000Form 8606, line 22$55,500
1998Form 8606, line 16Form 8606, line 15
1999Form 8606, line 16Form 8606, line 15
2000Form 8606, line 16Form 8606, line 15
2001Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2002Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2003Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2004Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2005Form 8606, line 18$10,000Form 8606, line 17$-0-
2006Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2007Form 8606, line 18Form 8606, line 17
2008Form 8606, line 18
and
Form 1040, line 16b; Form 1040A, line 12b; or Form 1040NR, line 17b*
Form 8606, line 17
and
Form 1040, line 16a; Form 1040A, line 12a; or Form 1040NR, line 17a**
2009Form 8606, line 18
and
Form 1040, line 16b; Form 1040A, line 12b; or Form 1040NR, line 17b*
Form 8606, line 17
and
Form 1040, line 16a; Form 1040A, line 12a; or Form 1040NR, line 17a**
2010Form 8606, lines 18 and 23Form 8606, lines 17 and 22
2011Form 8606, line 18
and
Form 1040, line 16b; Form 1040A, line 12b; or Form 1040NR, line 17b*
$10,000Form 8606, line 17
and
Form 1040, line 16a; Form 1040A, line 12a; or Form 1040NR, line 17a**
2012Form 8606, line 18
and
Form 1040, line 16b; Form 1040A, line 12b; or Form 1040NR, line 17b*
Form 8606, line 17
and
Form 1040, line 16a; Form 1040A, line 12a; or Form 1040NR, line 17a**
2013Form 8606, line 18
and
Form 1040, line 16b; Form 1040A, line 12b; or Form 1040NR, line 17b*
Form 8606, line 17
and
Form 1040, line 16a; Form 1040A, line 12a; or Form 1040NR, line 17a**
2013Form 8606, line 25  
*Only include those amounts rolled over to a Roth IRA.
**Only include any contributions (usually Form 1099-R, box 5) that were taxable to you when made and rolled over to a Roth IRA.
taxmap/pubs/p590-017.htm#en_us_publink1000231076

How Do You Figure the Taxable Part?(p75)

rule
To figure the taxable part of a distribution that is not a qualified distribution, complete Form 8606, Part III.